Floating Cloud, A Beautiful Sound Responsive Lamp That Levitates Above Its Base — Laughing Squid

 

Designer Richard Clarkson known for his beautiful cloud designs, partnered again with Crealev to create the “Floating Cloud“. While the designers made decision to remove the speakers that were in previous products, this soft light responds with colors to music and human voices while levitating above its base. After months of design research and user…

via Floating Cloud, A Beautiful Sound Responsive Lamp That Levitates Above Its Base — Laughing Squid

Two Types: The Faces of Britain

We are surrounded by types, the words on signs, buses, shops and documents which guide us through our lives. Two types in particular are regarded as the faces of Britain – Johnston and Gill Sans.

I stumbled across this one night and I am so glad I watched it back and learned more about these fonts, which are part of British culture.

A surprising journey from its creation, to break out away from the chaos of serif font advertising, to falling out of favour as old fashioned and associated with wartime posters, on to re-emerging as fashionable and anti-establishment in the 1960s and 80s.

The programme also features a preview of the new BBC Sans typeface which has begun to roll out already.

via BBC Four – Two Types: The Faces of Britain

Secrets of Silicon Valley

Jamie Bartlett uncovers the dark reality behind Silicon Valley’s glittering promise to build a better world. The tech gods believe progress is powered by technology tearing up the world as it is – a process they call disruption.

Interesting two part series. If you are not familiar with the tech/startup scene you might want to be in a good/hopeful mood before you watch it.

via BBC iPlayer – Secrets Of Silicon Valley – Series 1: 1. The Disruptors

Facebook to feature slower websites less?

Facebook wields a huge amount of power over what sites get served to you in your News Feed, and now the company is adding another layer to that by taking site speed into account. According to Facebook, “Factors such as the person’s current network connection and the general speed of the corresponding webpage will be considered. If signals indicate the webpage will load quickly, the link to that webpage might appear higher in your feed.”

Amusing if Facebook is the trigger to make site owners sit finally up and and take notice of their websites performance, despite Instant Articles, Google AMP and FBs attempt to invent their own internet with internet.org. It would be highly ironic if this leads people to browse outside FBs walled garden once again.

via Facebook will show fewer links to slow-loading websites – The Verge

How We Got the Favicon

And just like that, the favicon made its way into Internet Explorer 5, which would go on to become one of the largest browser releases the web has ever seen.

The next day, Sun was reprimanded by his manager for letting the feature get by so quickly. As it turns out, Shyam had specifically waited until later in the day, knowing that a less experienced Program Manager would give him a pass.

via How We Got the Favicon – The History of the Web

Raising Our Common Voice For The Web – Internet Citizen

I’m excited to share that this morning Mozilla is introducing Project Common Voice, a crowdsourced initiative to build an open source data set for voice recognition apps.

That sounds wonky, but you use voice recognition apps all the time. They’re behind the services from Google, Apple and Amazon that recognize your voice and make your devices do things on command. Example: “Siri, download Firefox!” 🙂

Experts think voice recognition applications represent the next big thing. The problem is the current ecosystem favors Big Tech and leaves out the next wave of innovators. These are the people who will take this incredible technology to the next level.

via Raising Our Common Voice For The Web – Internet Citizen