Microsoft Device Attempt To Bolster App Line-up?

Microsoft is exploring potential new avenues to remedy its issues with a lack of applications in the context of its rumored dual-screen mobile Surface device – which will allegedly utilize a custom version of Windows 10, referred to as Andromeda – beyond initial app expansion plans driven by Progressive Web Apps.

via Microsoft is exploring new ways to seriously bolster its app line-up ahead of Surface Phone | TechRadar

I had this in my mind when I heard about this rumoured device. They need developers to think about and build for smaller device form factors before they could think about launching a Surface Phone. Currently they have a hole in the form factors Windows runs on.

They seem happy being apps on other platforms right now but,  the phone is the gateway for future Microsoft customers. Its the most used device for many users. What is installed by default can lock customers in to non-Microsoft services. So I think they have to try and crack this market again with their own phone.

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Android’s trust problem isn’t getting better – The Verge

The gap between Android and its nemesis, Apple’s iOS, has always boiled down to trust. Unlike Google, Apple doesn’t make its money by tracking the behavior of its users, and unlike the vast and varied Android ecosystem, there are only ever a couple of iPhone models, each of which is updated with regularity and over a long period of time. Owning an iPhone, you can be confident that you’re among Apple’s priority users (even if Apple faces its own cohort of critics accusing it of planned obsolescence), whereas with an Android device, as evidenced today, you can’t even be sure that the security bulletins and updates you’re getting are truthful.

via Android’s trust problem isn’t getting better – The Verge

Every time I have considered an Android device I get another reminder that the ecosystem is at odds with good and ongoing security.

The recent initiatives to get more of the update process out of the control of manufacturers is a good step. But the manufacturers are at odds with updates, they want to sell you a new device, so there will always be this clash.

Android is slowly getting there, but not to the point where I would gladly throw all my data into an Android device just yet and believe that my phone would remain secure and updated.

Progressive Web Apps (PWA) can be the next platform – with Chrome, Samsung Internet and now Firefox Mobile supporting the concept and Safari in future. PWA can sit seamlessly alongside native apps right now on your device and soon in the app stores.

Desktop support is in progress, congratulations if you are a web developer you may be called software developer in future, as the two disciplines will be indistinguishable in future. As will any concept of a ‘mobile’ browser, as now the OS are starting to run on any form factor.

Truly multi-platform progress.

From my latest post on mobile browser choices on http://www.paulfosterdesign.co.uk

Web development explained to a time traveler from ten years ago

I’m glad that you’re still interested in computers! Today we have many more of them than we did 10 years ago, and that comes with new challenges. We wear computers on our wrists and faces, keep them in our pockets, and have them in our fridges and kettles. The cars are driving themselves pretty well, and we’ve taught programs to be better than humans at pretty much every game out there — except maybe drinking.

Crazy what can happen in 10 years.

via Web development explained to a time traveler from ten years ago

Windows Phone was a glorious failure

But the overall failure of Windows Phone masks a series of smaller successes and advances, which Microsoft and its hardware partners have never received enough credit for. At its outset in 2010, Windows Phone was the boldest and most original reimagining of what a smartphone can be after Apple’s iPhone introduction three years prior. Unlike Android, Windows Phone was not a re-creation of the iOS icon grid; also unlike Android, Windows Phone ran fast and fluid on very basic hardware.

via Windows Phone was a glorious failure – The Verge

This pretty much sums up why I, even after abandoning Windows, bought a plucky Nokia Lumia 520 and loved it.