BBC iPlayer – Formula E: Driving Change

How is Formula E Racing helping us to make the shift towards electric cars? Idris Elba, Sienna Miller, Orlando Bloom and Sir Richard Branson have their say. Newsbeat Reporter Ellie Roper follows team DS Virgin Racing, as driver Alex Lynn takes his first year behind the wheel.

via BBC iPlayer – Newsbeat Documentaries – Formula E – Driving Change

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LeBlanc Leaving Top Gear

I always thought Matt was an odd and token choice – picked for global appeal rather than natural fit. I liked the films he appeared in and he was a natural behind the wheel, however the studio pieces always felt awkward, to me.
I felt the recent season was one of may favourites. Its a shame that once again they have to build a team again. I’m still a fan of Rory, who I think should front the show. He’s great on the Extra Gear show.

The death of the newsfeed

One basic problem here is that if the feed is focused on ‘what do I want to see?’, then it cannot be focused on ‘what do my friends want (or need) me to see?’ Sometimes this is the same thing – my friend and I both want me to see that they’re throwing a party tonight. But if every feed is a sample, then a user has no way to know who will see their post. Indeed, conceptually one might suggest that they have no way to know if anyone will see this post. Of course, Facebook’s engagement teams won’t let that happen – if I feel too much that I’m shouting into the wilderness I’ll leave (this is one of Twitter’s new user problems), and so I’ll be rationed out at least enough exposure to friends and engagement feedback to keep posting. Until you don’t. But if something was really important, why would you put it on Facebook?

I think one could suggest that this is some of what’s behind the suggestions of systemically lower engagement on Facebook newsfeeds, and behind the obvious growth of person-to person chat (most obviously WhatsApp, iMessage, FB Messenger and Instagram – three of which Facebook of course owns). The social dynamics of a 1:1 chat work much more strongly against overload, and even if one person does overshare they’re in a separate box, that you can mute if you like.

via The death of the newsfeed — Benedict Evans

Two Types: The Faces of Britain

We are surrounded by types, the words on signs, buses, shops and documents which guide us through our lives. Two types in particular are regarded as the faces of Britain – Johnston and Gill Sans.

I stumbled across this one night and I am so glad I watched it back and learned more about these fonts, which are part of British culture.

A surprising journey from its creation, to break out away from the chaos of serif font advertising, to falling out of favour as old fashioned and associated with wartime posters, on to re-emerging as fashionable and anti-establishment in the 1960s and 80s.

The programme also features a preview of the new BBC Sans typeface which has begun to roll out already.

via BBC Four – Two Types: The Faces of Britain

Secrets of Silicon Valley

Jamie Bartlett uncovers the dark reality behind Silicon Valley’s glittering promise to build a better world. The tech gods believe progress is powered by technology tearing up the world as it is – a process they call disruption.

Interesting two part series. If you are not familiar with the tech/startup scene you might want to be in a good/hopeful mood before you watch it.

via BBC iPlayer – Secrets Of Silicon Valley – Series 1: 1. The Disruptors